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Traditional Welsh cakes recipe

Traditional Welsh cakes recipe

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From the heart of rural mid-Wales come these traditional Welsh cakes. Forget smelling the roses, instead, eat a Welsh cake and watch some rugby! Bendigedig!!


Hampshire, England, UK

172 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 20 Welsh cakes

  • 225g salted butter or lard
  • 450g self raising flour
  • 170g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 170g sultanas
  • caster sugar, for dusting

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:10min ›Extra time:20min cooling › Ready in:40min

  1. In a large bowl, rub the butter into the flour until it resembles breadcrumbs. Add the sugar, eggs and sultanas. Mix with your hands until a firm dough forms.
  2. Turn out the dough onto a floured board and roll out until 1cm (1/2 in) thick, then cut into rounds using a fluted cutter.
  3. To cook, grease a bakestone or a cast iron pan with butter and then wipe away with kitchen paper. Cook the Welsh cakes for 2 to 3 minutes until a dark caramel colour forms on the underside, then flip over and cook the same on the other side.
  4. Arrange on a serving plate, then dust with caster sugar while still hot. Serve hot or cold.

Tip

Traditionally, Welsh cakes were made on a bakestone. These have become popular again and are easy to pick up in high street cooking supply shops.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(14)

Reviews in English (12)

It seemed like there wasn't enough flour my mixture was just a gooey mess had to add a lot more flour till it formed a firm dough. A bit disappointed as I'm welsh living in England and these are the one thing I miss the most-08 Jan 2014

Yum yum yum! These were totally lush and went down a treat.-30 Jan 2014

Made these today for an afternoon tea party and they were fabulous. Light, crumbly - just as they should be. Followed the recipe exactly.-30 Jan 2014


Homemade Welsh Cakes

Just check out these pics! And I mean both the pictures and the pics—because you can also call Welsh Cakes pics, or bakestones, or just delicious with a cup of tea.

My homemade Welsh cakes are so tender and buttery they practically melt in your mouth. They’re almost scone-like in texture, but their flavor comes alive thanks to warm nutmeg and cinnamon and sweet currants. They’re dipped in sugar at the end, which gives the cakes a perfect sweetness and an irresistible texture.

You heat these on your stovetop in a castiron skillet or non-stick pan, so there’s no need to heat up your kitchen with your oven! It’s a fantastic recipe for a quiet, warm afternoon.


Welsh cakes

This Welsh cakes recipe, which follows a classic recipe and is cooked on a griddle, is hard to beat. Whip up a batch for St. David's Day – they are incredibly easy to make and if you don’t have a traditional griddle, then a heavy cast iron frying pan can be used instead.

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(Welsh cakes, in Welsh: picau ar y maen, pice bach, cacen gri or teisen radell)

1 March marks St David’s Day (the patron saint of Wales), so what better time to get my old griddle out and make a batch of Welsh cakes. I love baking on my old griddle, it is about sixty years old and was my grandmother's, and many a pancake, hot cake, Welsh cake or singin’ hinny I have seen my grandmother make on this much loved piece of vintage kitchen equipment.

Griddle cookery, or should I say Girdle cookery to use the Scottish and old fashioned English term for a griddle pan, used to be very popular all over the UK, with most housewives having a griddle to hand for easily made tea time treats.

With most people cooking on or over solid fuel, the heavy cast iron griddle pans were perfect for pancakes, quick breads and scone-like cakes, such as the Welsh cake and its North Eastern cousin, the singin’ hinny. In Wales, cast iron griddles are also known as bakestones, and so these wee fruited cakes are often known by the same name in certain parts of Wales, as well as griddle cakes.

Welsh cakes are incredibly easy to make and if you don’t have a traditional griddle, then a heavy cast iron frying pan can be used instead – but do not attempt to make them in a modern non-stick pan, as they can burn when cooked this way. They can be made in under half an hour and any that are not eaten on the day can be popped into the school or office lunch box as a treat the next day, although like all scone-style bakes, they are always better eaten on the same day, and when warm too.

You don’t have to be Welsh to enjoy these Welsh Cakes, and to all my Welsh friends out there, as well as all of the Welsh readers, all that remains for me to say is hapus Dydd Gŵyl Dewi, which is Happy Saint David’s Day in Welsh!


Traditional Welsh Food

What is traditional Welsh food?

Traditional Welsh food recipes have been handed down one generation to another with written recipes rare and when written tended to be ‘anglicised’. As a consequence Traditional Welsh food could easily be called regional Welsh food as the same type of dish was slightly different one side of the mountain to the other or one valley to another.

Welsh cookery is said to originate from the daily meals of village folk rather than the kitchens of the gentry. This is so easily demonstrated in the traditional Welsh foods of Welsh Cawl and Welsh Rarebit.

Because of the historical Welsh way of life food was either cooked in a cauldron or on a bakestone and this has in many ways brought forward into more modern ways of traditional welsh food.

There was much unrest in Wales around food in the 18 th and early 19 th centuries which was only brought to an end by the industrial revolution at the end of the 19 th century.

At this time not only did Wales have the influence of the Italian immigrants which is still around today. As a consequence most traditional Welsh foods are recorded from around this time such as Welsh Cakes, Bara Brith, Glamorgan Sausages, Welsh Rarebit.

Here you’ll find info and recipes for a variety of traditional Welsh food. Some of the recipes will have a slightly modern twist on the traditional but taste every bit as good as the original recipe.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces, plus more for griddle
  • 1/2 cup dried currants
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped candied citrus peel, such as lemon or citron
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk
  • Superfine or confectioners' sugar, for sprinkling

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, and lemon zest. Using a pastry blender or your fingers, cut in butter until mixture is a sandy consistency. Stir in currants, candied citrus peel, egg, and milk until a soft dough forms. Gently knead to combine.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough 1/4 inch thick. Using a 2-inch fluted square cutter, cut out squares transfer to prepared sheets. Reroll scraps once and cut out more squares.

Preheat a cast-iron griddle over medium. Lightly brush with butter. Working in batches, transfer dough squares to griddle and cook, turning once, until golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes per side. Adjust heat as necessary. Transfer to a serving plate sprinkle with superfine sugar, as desired. Serve immediately, or store in an airtight container at room temperature 3 to 5 days.


Welsh Cakes in Welsh:

Picau ar y maen, pice bach, cacen gri or teisen radell

With St David’s day (the patron saint of Wales) approaching fast on the 1 st March, it seemed fitting to get my old griddle out and make a batch of Welsh Cakes one wet and miserable afternoon. I love baking on my old griddle, it is about sixty years old and was my grandmothers, and many a pancake, hot cake, Welsh cake or “Singin’ Hinny” I have seen my grandmother make on this much loved piece of vintage kitchen equipment.

Griddle cookery, or should I say Girdle cookery to use the Scottish and old fashioned English term for a griddle pan, used to be very popular all over the UK, with most housewives having a griddle to hand for easily made tea time treats. With most people cooking on or over solid fuel, the heavy cast iron griddle pans were perfect for pancakes, quick breads and scone-like cakes, such as the Welsh cake and its North Eastern cousin, the Singin’ Hinny. In Wales, cast iron griddles are also known as “Bakestones”, and so these wee fruited cakes are often known by the same name in certain parts of Wales, as well as griddle cakes.

Welsh cakes are incredibly easy to make and if you don’t have a traditional griddle, then a heavy cast iron frying pan can be used instead – but do not attempt to make them in a modern non-stick pan, they can burn when cooked this way. They can be made in under half an hour and any that are not eaten on the day can be popped into the school or office lunch box as a treat the next day, although like all “scone style” bakes they are always better eaten on the same day, and when warm and spread with butter too.

The recipe I am sharing today comes from one of my old Be-Ro cookbooks and is the ONLY recipe I use when I make a batch of Welsh Cakes it’s the very same recipe that my grandmother used, as well as my mum, and the recipe never fails. I use my Be-Ro cookbooks a lot and I have a collection of most of the editions going right back to the 1930’s. It’s interesting to note that in some of the older Be-Ro cookbooks I have in my collection, that Welsh Cakes were called Girdle Cakes, and we often used to refer to them that way when I was growing up, a term that is still used in North East England and Scotland.

You don’t have to be Welsh to enjoy these Welsh Cakes, and to all my Welsh friends out there, as well as all of the Welsh readers, all that remains for me to say is “hapus Dydd Gŵyl Dewi”, which is Happy Saint David’s Day in Welsh, Karen


Start by sieving the flour into a bowl and mix together with the margarine or butter.

Add the sugar and sultanas until combined. Next, add one of the eggs. If the mixture binds well, move on to the next stage. If not, add the second egg and mix until bound.

Roll the mixture out on a floured board until it is circa 6mm thick. Using a small round cookie cutter, cut 10-12 round cakes and bake on a greased pan until golden. This will take approximately four to five minutes on a medium heat. Once cooked, dust with caster sugar and enjoy!

Top tip: The cooking time will vary depending on the size of the cakes – when ready the cakes should feel springy, not wet to the touch. For this and other recipes take a look at the Visit Wales dedicated Welsh food page filled with information and traditional treats to try.


Makes 15-18 | Prep 15 minutes | Cook 10 minutes

Cooking on a bakestone or griddle has been common practice throughout Wales for centuries. The art of a good Welsh cake is to cook them quickly on both sides so that they stay moist in the centre, but take care not to burn them!

Method
01 Sieve the flour, salt and spice into a mixing bowl. Rub in the fats until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs.
02 Add the sugar, lemon rind and dried fruit. Pour in the beaten egg and stir to make a rm Sieve the our, salt and spice into a mixing bowl. Rub in the fats until the mixture looks like ne breadcrumbs. dough.
03 On a oured board, roll or press the dough to approximately 5mm thick. Cut into discs with a 4-5cm cutter. Or cut into squares, you will not need to keep re-rolling if you use this shape.
04 Bake the Welsh cakes on a medium hot griddle, turning once, until golden brown on both sides but still a little soft in the middle.
05 Dust with caster sugar while still hot. If you do not have a griddle you could use a heavy base frying pan, lightly buttered.


A few simple ingredients to make a delicious batch of traditional Welsh Cakes

Self raising flour, salted butter, spice, sugar, dried fruit, and a beaten egg to bind – that’s all you need to make Welsh cakes! Mix the flour and butter as if you are making a crumble, add the spice, sugar and dried fruit, and stir in an egg to combine to a firm dough. Allow to rest, then roll out and cut into circles with a cookie cutter, and cook on a hot pan on the hob for a few minutes each side.

Sprinkle the cooked Welsh cakes with sugar and eat immediately!


Traditional Welsh cakes

They’re not something you come across often these days, but these warm, buttery cakes were once a staple in many a Welsh household. They’re a lovely alternative to scones and taste delicious warm out of the pan and slathered with butter. The recipe calls for currents, but you can use raisins, sultanas, dried blueberries or whatever else you have on hand. Welsh cakes aren’t that common in Australian anymore and the recipe seems to have gone missing in a lot of modern cookbooks so give them a go and bring this old favourite back into fashion!

Makes 16

Ingredients

  • 225g plain flour
  • 85g caster sugar
  • ½ tsp mixed spice
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 50g butter, cut into small pieces
  • 50g lard, cut into small pieces, plus extra for frying
  • 50g currant
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Splash of milk

Method

1. Tip flour, sugar, mixed spice, baking powder and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Then, with your fingers, rub in the butter and lard until crumbly. Mix in currants. Work egg into the mixture until you have soft dough, adding a splash of milk if it seems a little dry – it should be the same consistency as shortcrust pastry.

2. Roll out dough on a lightly floured work surface to the thickness of your little finger. Cut out rounds using a 6cm cutter, re-rolling any trimmings. Grease a flat griddle pan or heavy frying pan with lard, and place over a medium heat. Cook the Welsh cakes in batches, for about 3 minutes each side, until golden brown, crisp and cooked through. Serve warm with butter and jam, or simply sprinkled with caster sugar. Cakes will stay fresh in a tin for 1 week.