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Graydon Carter Welcomes New Executive Chef to Beatrice Inn

Graydon Carter Welcomes New Executive Chef to Beatrice Inn

The Beatrice Inn's new executive chef is Angie Mar

The Beatrice Inn welcomes a new executive chef, Angie Mar, previously of The Spotted Pig.

Vanity Fair’s Graydon Carter has announced the appointment of Angie Mar as the new executive chef for The Beatrice Inn, the glamorous West Village restaurant that Carter owns along with Emil Varda and Brett Rasinski. Chef Mar is a graduate of the French Culinary School and has worked with Andrew Tarlow of Reynard and Marlow & Sons. More recently Mar worked under April Bloomfield at The Spotted Pig.

Chef Mar’s classic American menu will be created from handpicked vegetables and fruits, free-range chicken and grass-fed meat from upstate New York. In addition to her locavore-centric menu, chef Mar will be bringing a signature 45-day dry aged burger to The Beatrice Inn that “will soon become known as one of the best in the city.”

“We all have that one dish from our childhood that stays with us,” said chef Mar. “When people eat our food, I hope that it takes them to place of comfort, but also somewhere elevated and unexpected.”

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Angie Mar is a Rare Find

Why is being freelance so much fun? Because you get to do cool things like projects with Ralph Lauren Home, where you are offered the opportunity not only interview the hottest chefs, but also be photographed with them. As intimidated as I was to meet Angie Mar, owner and executive chef of the much-lauded Beatrice Inn, she was a blast to hang with. Oh, and I got to taste her indescribable 160-day whiskey-aged beef. Here’s the story:
Angie Mar is standing in the kitchen of New York’s Beatrice Inn, inspecting a side of beef rib. With its marbleized mosaic, buds of faded lavender nestled into its edges, it is quite a vision of beauty. She gives her ok, and sous chef Nicole Averkiou carries it to the grill.

One of the first things I notice about Mar is her style. Despite not being the tallest person in the room, she is a dominant figure. With a mane of jet black hair, piercing eyes whose lids are colored in black shadow, she is wearing a vintage leopard coat over a black leather shirt. She makes bold pronunciations, and yet is quick with a laugh. Look up the term “bad ass” in the dictionary, and there she is. Her confidence in the kitchen translates to the way she designed the Beatrice’s two dining rooms: one is dark and wood-paneled—very men’s club—while the other is light and airy with a retro safari vibe. Against the dark green leather upholstered banquettes and white tablecloths, the Ralph Lauren leopard print dinnerware reflects Mar’s penchant for bold style.

“I want people to come to the Beatrice and feel its storied history,” explains Mar. “For a restaurant that has such a rich past, I feel honored being part of the next chapter.”

It’s been just over a year since Mar took ownership of the Beatrice Inn, having purchased it from Graydon Carter and partners Emil Varda and Brett Rasinski (she had been chef there since 2013). She promptly dropped the dress code and turned its fledgling menu into a carnivore’s delight, a decision heavily influenced by famed French butcher Yves-Marie Le Bourdonnec, whose steak Mar dined on during a meal in Paris prompted her to learn the art of aging beef from the master himself.

“I don’t speak French and he doesn’t speak English, but we communicated through the food’s taste, smell and how it looked,” she recalls.

Mar returned home and began working on creating her own version of aged beef, playing around with the number of days in which to age the Beatrice’s whiskey-soaked, cloth-wrapped beef. She found the sweet spot at 160, and word soon began to spread about this American anomaly.

“I’m still not sure exactly how the science of my technique works, or why I get a 20% more yield on my whiskey beef than if it wasn’t aged in whiskey,” she laughs. “But I don’t really need to know why, because I know it works. The wait list is usually about a month long, but I always make sure we have enough for our regular customers.”

Hospitality is in Mar’s blood. Her aunt was Ruby Chow, of the eponymous Seattle restaurant, but it was shuttered before Mar was born.

“She always carried on with the hospitality and entertaining aspect of it,” remembers Mar. “The importance of that was something I learned from a very young age.”

Then perhaps that’s why, despite a successful prior career in real estate, the professional kitchen called to her.

“I’ve never felt at home in my own skin as I do now that I’m a chef. We all want to be passionate about what we do, and I’m so grateful that I’ve found that passion.”

Mar’s passion for what’s on the plate carries over to the table itself.

“On the bottom of my menu is a quote from Hyman G. Rickover that reads, ‘The devil is in the details. So is salvation.’ I think that’s a quote to live by. We carry that philosophy in our drinks, we implement it in our food, and on our table. At a restaurant, everything starts at the table.”

Mar and I are seated at a corner banquette in the back dining room one late Fall afternoon. As the first slice of beef explodes on my tongue, I close my eyes and take inventory of my taste buds. Mar picks up the bone of her famous Tomahawk Rib Eye, then, as she begins making her way along its marvelous bits, gestures for me to do the same. Vegetarians would be aghast. I do not hesitate.

“We’re a very specific restaurant and we have a very specific point of view here,” she says. “I never want to have to apologize for that, ever.”

Soon, she hopes to be unapologetic across the pond as well. Plans to open a Beatrice Inn in London are in nascent stages.

“London has the right climate for our menu, so our food translates perfectly,” she affirms. “My mom grew up there, it’s like going home.”

This year, she heads to her real childhood home, in Seattle, where Thanksgiving dinner includes close to 25. “My father is one of ten kids, so I have a really extended family, and we go all-out with the food. There’s a turkey, but there’s also corned beef, prime rib. And we always make my dad’s stuffing, which is this beautiful mix of east and west. He makes it with brioche breadcrumbs, Chinese sausage lap cheong, bacon, shiitake mushrooms and oysters, and all the herbs. It’s the most insane stuffing ever.”

Spending the better part of night and day with the Beatrice staff, she has formed a tight bunch who do their own pre-holiday celebration, where everyone contributes a dish and even former employees come back.

She dreams of merging her Beatrice and Seattle families someday, but has somewhat loftier goals when asked who’d turn up to her fantasy holiday feast.

“Julia Child would carve the turkey, our wine director Nathan Wooden would serve the wine and Antanas our bartender would make the Christmas absinthe punch. My father would drink the whole bottle of Madeira 27, but maybe he’d share some with Auguste Escoffier. Marco Pierre White would be there, too standing behind me, criticizing my food. God, I would love that.”


Drinking with Angie Mar

Tell us a little about The Beatrice Inn and what you suggest ordering at the bar.

The Bea (The Beatrice Inn) is such a storied establishment, with roots dating back to the 1920s. It was one of New York’s first speakeasies and my key bartender, Antanas Samkas, has a beautiful way of maintaining the classic whilst giving it freshness.

My favorite cocktails on our menu are his Smoked Manhattan and the Laphroaig Champagne Cocktail. If you’re popping in for a bite, you must get the Poutine of Game Birds. It’s a dish that we do only at the bar and is the perfect remedy for the winter cold.

How did you get started in the biz?

I have been cooking for eight years, but I come from a family of restaurateurs. So it’s in my DNA, I suppose.

What is your current go-to drink order?

I tend to be quite predictable when it comes to spirits. Martini after a long day vintage Madeira with meats whisky to finish a meal and Champagne when I’m in love.

Do you drink coffee or tea?

I drink both! I always begin my morning with the biggest coffee imaginable. My mother grew up in Oxford, so I was raised with the religious philosophy that there is NOTHING a pot of tea can’t fix.

I generally take mine with milk and two sugars. Tea & Sympathy is one of my favorite spots in the West Village.

Tell us about your first boozy experience?

I think I was about 15, traveling with my mother in London. I was permitted to have a Grasshopper, so long as I didn’t tell my father, which I clearly did as soon as I saw him. Recently, Antanas added a Smoked Grasshopper to our menu, paying homage to that childhood memory.

It’s fun and playful he makes a light as air foam with creme anglais and elderflower that is then smoked with cherry wood and served in a vintage crystal egg. It makes me feel like I am a child all over again.

What is your hangover remedy?

Korean BBQ and an Asahi. I do believe that kalbi ribs, rice, and kimchi stew can solve even the nastiest hangovers.

If you are day drinking, what’s your poison?

Champagne. There is no other option.

What is your very last sip death row drink?

1927 Bastardo Madeira. Madeira has been my obsession for the past ten years. When I bought The Bea, one of my goals for the beverage program was to amass a collection of Madeiras that was the largest and most rare in the city.

One of my dearest friends set about finding the rarest and oldest vintages for me and he came back with something that is near and dear to my heart. 1927 was a spectacular year for New York The Yankees won the world series with their Murder’s Row, “The Jazz Singer” debuted, Charles A.

Lindbergh made the first solo transatlantic flight from New York to Paris, and most importantly for me, it was my father’s birth year. We bought all of the remaining bottles of 1927, and they are safely stored at the Bea. There is one bottle though that I have resolved not to open only for something incredibly special.

If you could have drinks with anyone dead, alive or fictional, who would it be and what would you both be drinking?

If I could choose anyone at all, I would throw a great cocktail party, and invite everyone. [Chef Auguste] Escoffier and Julia Child would be in attendance, along with my dear friend Jordana Rothman of Food & Wine Magazine.

They would drink martinis. Madame de Pompadour would be drinking Billecart Salmon by the magnum all evening, and eating chocolates, and Allison Park, my dear friend and owner of Brenne Whisky would be pouring her 10-year single malt.

Antanas Samkas, key bartender, would be doing magic tricks and making cocktails, and Sinatra would be drinking scotch with Nathan Wooden, the Wine Director of Carbone, while Marco Pierre White drank huge reds and cooked us his famous pig trotter.

With so many big name industry names in your rolodex, who is the best drinking buddy for a wild night?

Diane von Furstenberg has the best parties at The Beatrice. She is one of my favorite people with whom to share my stash of Japanese whisky.

What’s your soundtrack in the kitchen?

I love music and The Bea, it has a fun vibe about it. Our cocktails are all named after old school rock and roll songs. When I’m in a Saturday night mood, Luchini by Camp Lo. On Sundays when I’m recipe testing, ‘Round Midnight, by Miles Davis.

When I’m writing and creating, it’s typically Mendelssohn or Chopin. And when I’m just in a fun mood, probably “Close to Me” by The Cure.

Tell us a bit about how the beverage program at The Beatrice Inn and how it compliments your cuisine.

I am tremendously proud of our beverage program and the people who’ve built it. Antanas Samkus is a mad genius. He’s just brilliant really. We met three years ago and have been tied at the hip ever since.

His imagination and creativity are matched only by his dedication, and his dedication is matched only by his tremendous knowledge of food and the vision of what we want The Beatrice to be. His cocktails are playful and imaginative, with roots in the classics, yet spun with fresh ideas.

There is no seat I’d rather be at in the city, then at the bar of The Beatrice. The music, the banter, the show, the drinks! It’s such an awesome sight to behold.

The 45-day dry aged burger is kind of the talk of legends. What would you pair with it?

Thank you. That burger was truly a labor of love, and I am grateful that over the years it’s gained such a following. For me, I love to curl up by the fireplace and drink Peyre Rose Clos de Cistes.

I’m so thrilled to have it on our wine list, as we are one of only four restaurants in the country to offer it. It’s perfect for our food, as we often play with the ideas of masculinity and femininity and this wine exemplifies that.

You’re from Seattle. What’s your favorite bar there?

Honestly, I don’t get back to Seattle much so don’t get to enjoy the nightlife. When I am there, I am always thrilled to spend time with my family in my childhood home, around a fireplace making s’mores and drinking delicious reds or whisky.

Any advice for aspiring young guns wanting to break into the industry?

Don’t get into this industry for fame or for money. Do it for passion. There’s no school like the old school, so that’s how we run our kitchen. Our bar and floor are French military-style dedication, self-discipline, passion, and learning. It’s creating a future generation of cooks and restaurant professionals that I hope will grow to become better than ours.

I often see young cooks who are just after money or fame and lack passion and dedication. Those are the ones who will never make a difference. Stay true to your passion, learn from the best and dedicate yourself to being better. A better cook, a learned person, someone who works smarter, harder, faster and cleaner than anyone else. And someone who isn’t afraid of failure.

This industry is tough. We breed toughness, and the industry will also chew you up if you’re not strong enough. But when the people are the right fit, we also breed the best family to be a part of… And that is something that will never fade for me.


How Fashion Has Influenced the Food of a Top NYC Chef

&ldquoI just want to eat beef and wear heels,&rdquo chef Angie Mar told FN. She&rsquos not being dramatic. Scroll through her Instagram and you&rsquoll see just as much red from the bottom of her Christian Louboutin heels as you would from a 60-day dry-aged prime rib.

Fashion has been a major influence on her food since she can remember.

&ldquoMy mother always says I&rsquom the same person that I was when I was 7 years old. That&rsquos when I was stealing Food & Wine and Vogue off of her dresser,&rdquo she said. &ldquoOne of the things that I love most about fashion is that it&rsquos very much like food. I can decide to be one person one day and somebody else the next.”

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For Mar, who typically cooks in Adidas sneakers, forming a dish begins with an idea &mdash not the protein. &ldquoIt&rsquos less about the food and what I&rsquom actually cooking and more about the idea that ends up on the plate.&rdquo (She&rsquos been known to watch runway shows from Galliano and YSL and stroll through Bergdorf Goodman for inspiration).

When she&rsquos not in sweat suits and sneakers, glamour exudes her and that luxury is felt within her New York restaurant, The Beatrice Inn, which she bought in 2016. (Frequent guests include fashion folk, such as Diane von Furstenberg and Valentino Garavani.)

However, The Bea is much more than a sceney spot in downtown Manhattan. It&rsquos a city institution that once operated as a speakeasy in the 1920s, a family-owned Italian restaurant, followed by a nightclub. It was then owned by publishing magnate Graydon Carter.

Now under Mar, it&rsquos certainly a coveted reservation to snag, but its unapologetic personality is what makes it an unforgettable experience that goes beyond dining. And Mar is telling the story or her journey in her debut cookbook, &ldquoButcher + Beast,&rdquo which officially launched today.

&ldquoI just wanted to create a restaurant that was representative of New York,&rdquo she explained. &ldquoTo me, my version of New York, the New York I fell in love with, is one that&rsquos all encompassing and embraces all walks of life. I wrote about that in the book. New York embraced my oddities and neurosis and it does that for a lot of us. For me, everything truly fantastic starts at the dinner table. That&rsquos the environment we wanted to create. I just wanted people to be able to come and enjoy my food.&rdquo

Mar said it best. The Bea is unapologetic. She&rsquos not creating food just to appease a crowd. She is creating her food, dishes she loves, dishes she would eat and dishes she ardently believes in &mdash such as her signature roast duck flambé. (It&rsquos the meal DVF and Valentino indulged in at a New York Fashion Week event hosted during the restaurant&rsquos grand re-opening, according to an entry in the book.) It&rsquos also the dish closet to Mar&rsquos heart as it was something she ate with her family during the holidays.

&ldquoThe idea of having this amazing dish from my childhood and being able to share that with my diners every night here is something very special to me,&rdquo she said. &ldquoRegardless if people can actually cook the recipes or not, it&rsquos the story,&rdquo she said on the significance of her cookbook. &ldquoThat&rsquos the point. It&rsquos less about the food and more about the lives and the people that are around our tables. It represents a New York that is dying, changing.&rdquo

“Butcher + Beast: Mastering the Art of Meat” is available for purchase now.


Inside the Unapologetic Hedonism of NYC’s Glam Chef Angie Mar

Photo: courtesy Johnny Miller

Angie Mar is walking down the steps of her subterranean West Village restaurant, The Beatrice Inn. She&rsquos wearing a slip dress, a full-length fur coat, and nude Louboutin heels. There&rsquos a bottle of Champagne in one hand, and in the other a leash tethered to a taxidermied skunk.* &ldquoI thought to myself, if Salvador Dalí can walk around Paris with an anteater, I can absolutely walk into my own restaurant with a skunk,&rdquo Mar says.

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The skunk scene is not a common occurrence at The Beatrice Inn (or &ldquoBea&rdquo as Mar calls the restaurant), but the moment was memorialized for her debut cookbook Butcher + Beast, released on October 1 and photographed exclusively on Polaroid film by Johnny Miller. Also shot: Mar eating pasta while dressed in a red gown with a taxidermied boar&rsquos head in her lap Mar curled up in bed with truffled hen and leek pie, and former Food & Wine editor-in-chief Dana Cowin, also in a fur coat, chomping into the dry-aged Beatrice burger.

The book is a hedonist&rsquos collection of photographs and recipes. It&rsquos also a manifesto on craft, hard work, style and excess. Mar didn&rsquot dilute her world for consumers nor did she design the book for the four-letter-word-averse, restaurant critics, card-carrying members of PETA, incels or Mike Pence squares.

Mar may be the only chef I know who does not like vegetables, unless they&rsquore in service of meat. She abhors chicken and cooked fish, too. And she writes that after buying The Beatrice Inn from Graydon Carter in 2016, she implemented a &ldquozero fucks given&rdquo policy for 90 percent of her menu. The future would be authentic Mar, as carnal and over-the-top as she pleased.

The book was shot with a Polaroid camera. Photo: courtesy Johnny Miller

Dining at The Beatrice Inn is breathtakingly joyful if you submit, as I did last week, to eating fat sea scallops and trumpet mushrooms scented with peony, baked in puff pastry, and covered with sauce allemande and caviar. My table helped vanquish a whole rabbit smoked over Muscadet vines and packed with chestnut-giblet stuffing. We did eat vegetables: Kyoto carrots (&ldquobecause they&rsquore cute with the rabbit,&rdquo Mar says) and pommes Anna with crème fraîche and gorgonzola.

In 2019, critics have begun to push back on this indulgent brand of luxury, throw-back dining à la Tak Room, The Grill, and Bea. Do we really need spaces to make wealthy people feel comfortable and pampered? Do we need to champion restaurants that evoke eras when so many people were excluded from these centers of power? Mar answers with pheasant Périgord en croûte and crème brulée set in a marrow bone.

&ldquoHistory is important. No one is trying to celebrate exclusion. Chefs like Mario Carbone, Thomas Keller and myself are celebrating our history in food, and an era past. The Beatrice has been a part of New York for nearly 100 years. Why would we not celebrate its heritage and the impact that it has made on this city?&rdquo she says.

Mar&rsquos creative process relies on looking back, on visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art and burying herself in Escoffier. She cites Copacabana, The Great Gatsby, Sophia Loren in &ldquoLady Liberty,&rdquo Louis XV and Mary Queen of Scots as menu inspiration. She wields history skillfully and with purpose.

&ldquoI have always believed that in order to stay true to one&rsquos vision, it&rsquos best not to pay any mind to what&rsquos going on to the right or left of you. It&rsquos just a distraction,&rdquo she says. &ldquoI have never been afraid of a bit of controversy, and if I had been, The Beatrice would not be what it is today.&rdquo

The concept of family&mdashblood and chosen&mdashalso is paramount to Mar. The first time I visited the restaurant, right after Mar took over the kitchen, I ate and fell in love with her fork-tender, earthy and floral milk-braised pork shoulder. It&rsquos the first recipe in Butcher + Beast and a tribute to Sunday dinners with her family. Her father (who grew up in the restaurant business and died in 2018) and Pat LaFrieda (her mentor, friend and meat purveyor) loom large in the book. Mar also recounts cooking pasta for her brothers after her parents&rsquo divorce, eating Marie Callender pot pies with her mom and buying The Beatrice Inn with her cousin, Melissa Merrill Keary.

Chewing the fat with Angie Mar. Photo: Mark Mann

Mar, who notoriously does not share menu control with anyone, does share Butcher + Beast pages with her long-time sous chef Lucero Ramales, whose pozole is prized at staff meal. Antanas Samkus, Bea&rsquos bar director, contributed five cocktails to the book, and wine director Thera Clark and former beverage director Nathan Wooden, wrote essays on Champagne and Madeira, respectively.

Through the camp, Marlboros and dead animals, Butcher + Beast peels back the layers of Mar&rsquos emotional world. It also articulates her signature balance of masculine and feminine forms and flavors, best exemplified in dishes like the aforementioned milk-braised pork with fragrant jasmine rice soubise. Mar sees parallels with fashion: &ldquoI love dresses that embody a feminine silhouette, and also wear men&rsquos tuxedos if the mood strikes me, so shouldn&rsquot I be allowed to celebrate those notions on a plate, as well as in my wardrobe?&rdquo

The recipes&mdashmost of which are too complex for home cooks&mdashare reminders of Mar&rsquos devotion to craft. She&rsquos constantly experimenting with aging techniques, updating historic recipes, and pushing to make classic dishes one-of-a-kind-Mar. (Of her boudin noir, she writes, &ldquoThink Chanel.&rdquo)

For her 2019 autumn/winter menu, Mar found inspiration in Maria Grazia&rsquos Dior haute couture show. &ldquoIt was done exclusively in black, which I found to be fascinating. [The show] forced me to look at the details. The stitching. The craftmanship. And that&rsquos what food is, isn&rsquot it? It&rsquos the details and the craftsmanship that really make something sing,&rdquo she says.

Angie Mar sees more potential than most in a piece of meat, a basement restaurant, a night out in New York City&mdashand a cookbook project. You&rsquore welcome to join in. You just have to turn yourself over to the glamorous, gritty, romantic, uncompromising, and unapologetic world that is The Beatrice Inn and Butcher + Beast.

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article said the skunk was still alive and descented, but it was taxidermied.


Chef Angie Mar’s Côte de Boeuf Brings the Drama to Your Holiday Table—in a Good Way

Chef Angie Mar’s bold, unapologetic cuisine is just what you need to shake up your holiday feast this season. Mar is the chef-owner of New York's historic Beatrice Inn, a contemporary chop house where she showcases big flavors and dramatic presentations on a menu built on whole-animal butchery. Meat is a central piece of Mar’s culinary identity, simply because it’s what she loves to eat. “I don’t believe that anybody should ever be cooking with things that they don’t want to cook or they’re not passionate about,” she says.

While she’s all about over-the-top nights out on the town, Mar also holds dear the importance of dinners at home with family, instilled in her at an early age. She was raised in Seattle in a large family of restaurateurs, most notably her aunt Ruby Chow, owner of a self-named restaurant and a well-known activist who helped bring Chinese-American dining into the mainstream. Mar often cooked with Chow and other family members, planting the seed for her meat-centric approach.

“There was never a time that there was not a steak on our table or a rib roast on Sunday or ducks on Thanksgiving,” she says.

Mar didn’t venture into a professional culinary career until about 10 years ago, after a decade of working in Los Angeles real estate, feeling an instinctive pull to the kitchen. “There’s something about hospitality,” Mar says. “You can learn hospitality, but when it’s in your blood, when it’s in your DNA, I just think it’s what you should be doing.”

Her recently released first cookbook, Butcher and Beast: Mastering the Art of Meat, unites those passions for extravagant restaurant dining and intimate family meals, making the recipes ideal for the holidays. Dive head-first into Mar’s wild, carnivorous world with her dry-aged côte de boeuf with blistered blackberries, garlic confit and charred prawn butter—a staple at Beatrice Inn.

Layering textures, flavors and techniques, this recipe draws inspiration from the surf-n-turf cuisine of classic steak houses and turns it into one cohesive dish. “You take those two ideas, you’ve got shellfish and you’ve got beef, and you turn it into something different,” says Mar.

The star of the show is dry-aged côte de boeuf, also known as bone-in rib eye. Seek out beef that’s been aged for at least 45 days, but if you can’t find that at your local butcher, Mar suggests ordering from premium online supplier Pat LaFrieda.

The cut gets seared in rendered bone marrow, then that flavor-coated pan is used to blister berries with garlic confit and fresh thyme. The garlic brings a sweetness that can only be achieved after hours of baking in oil, and if you’re hoping for a shortcut, you’re out of luck. “There are no shortcuts in life, or in cooking,” Mar says.

Spooned over the steak is a butter made from whole charred prawns pureed in a food processor—shells and all. “I always think that every bit of the animal should be used,” Mar says. “And the shells give it a little bit of a texture, it’ll give it a little bit of a crunch, and also flavor.”

The fruit and herbs, along with fresh vanilla bean seeds, accent the rich, hearty elements in a way Mar describes as masculine-meets-feminine. “It’s more nuanced, it’s more delicate, it makes you think a little bit,” she says.

Vanilla may seem like a surprising choice here, but to Mar, it’s natural. “In my head it just makes sense,” she says. “[Vanilla] can be quite savory when it’s used in the right applications.”

For home cooks, Mar says one of the most important things is tempering your beef before it’s cooked and letting it rest after. “Letting your meat come up to room temperature for a good two hours before you cook it really helps because you’re going to get an even cooking temperature all the way through,” she says. “And then also resting the meat. I always say a good rule of thumb is to rest our meat for 50 percent of the time that it took to cook it.”

For a wine pairing, Mar chose Domaine Peyre Rose Coteaux du Languedoc Marlene No. 3 2005 from France’s Languedoc-Roussillon region, because it embodies that masculine-meets-feminine theme through its exceptional balance. “It’s got enough earthiness to it that it really complements the dry-aged beef, yet the tannins are just kind of perfect in that it cleanses your palate and makes you want to eat more, and that’s what all great wine should do.”

Below, Wine Spectator offers additional French wine picks with similar profiles of dark fruit flavors and earthy notes, including some Châteauneuf-du-Pape. As Mar says, “No one’s ever gonna go wrong with Châteauneuf-du-Pape.”

Dry-Aged Côte de Boeuf with Blistered Blackberries, Garlic Confit and Charred Prawn Butter

Reprinted with permission from Butcher and Beast: Mastering the Art of Meat by Angie Mar with Jamie Feldmar, copyright © 2019. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

Ingredients

For the rendered bone marrow:

For the garlic confit:

For the côte de boeuf:

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large head-on tiger prawns
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • Seeds of 1/4 vanilla bean
  • 6 tablespoons rendered bone marrow
  • 1 26- to 28-ounce aged bone-in côte de boeuf or rib eye
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 pint blackberries
  • 8 cloves garlic confit
  • 1/2 bunch fresh thyme
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

1. Prepare the rendered bone marrow: Put the bones in a large bowl with enough cold water to cover and let them soak in the refrigerator. Drain and re-cover with cold water every hour for 3 hours to purge them of any blood. Preheat oven to 425° F. Arrange the marrow bones in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until deep brown in color and the marrow is no longer pink, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove the bones from the oven. Pour any of the marrow that has rendered into liquid form out of the pan into a bowl. When the bones are cool enough to handle, scoop out any solid pieces of marrow into a small saucepan. Place the saucepan over low heat and slowly melt the marrow solids in the pan until liquid, then add them to the bowl with the other rendered marrow. Pour the liquid marrow through a fine-mesh strainer to remove any solid particles or bone fragments. Reserve 6 tablespoons and transfer the remainder to an airtight container and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

2. Prepare the garlic confit: Preheat the oven to 210° F. Trim the garlic heads slightly at the top (opposite the root end), just enough to expose a little bit of the clove, then break apart all the cloves with your hands, discarding the root ends. Place the cloves in a roasting pan or an ovenproof saucepot large enough to fit the garlic in a single layer, but small enough that the oil will fully cover it. Add the oil, then cover with a cartouche (a sheet of parchment paper cut into a round to fit the size and shape of the saucepot) and cover the pan with foil. Transfer to the oven and bake until the garlic is very soft, sweet and fragrant, about 3 1/2 hours. Remove the pan from the oven and allow garlic to cool. Reserve 8 cloves and pack the remainder into an airtight container, ensuring the garlic cloves are fully submerged in oil (add a bit more if necessary). Store the excess garlic covered in oil in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

3. Preheat the oven to 400° F. In a small sauté pan, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the prawns and cook until deep brown and caramelized, turning once, about 5 minutes per side. Remove from the heat and roughly chop the prawns (including the shell). Transfer to a food processor and add the butter and vanilla seeds. Pulse to combine until smooth. Set aside.

4. In a large ovenproof sauté pan, heat the rendered bone marrow over high heat. Season the steak liberally on both sides with salt. Add to the pan and sear, turning once, for about 2 minutes per side. Transfer the pan to the oven and roast, turning 2 to 3 times, until medium-rare (a thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the rib eye, away from the bone, should read 110° F), about 10 minutes. Transfer the steak to a rack or cutting board (set the sauté pan aside but don’t wash it yet) and let the steak rest for 10 to 12 minutes.

5. Set the reserved sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the berries and garlic confit and sauté until blistered and just warmed through, about 90 seconds. Add the thyme at the end to fry and finish with a few cracks of black pepper.

6. Cut the steak against the grain into 1/4-inch-thick slices and arrange on a platter. Spoon dollops of the prawn butter over the steak. Top with the berries, garlic confit and thyme. Serves 2.

8 French Reds

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good French red wines from recently rated releases. For the wines best from 2021 on, you can also seek out older vintages, or decant or pour the wines in advance of the meal to allow them some time to open up. More options can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.

DOMAINE JULIETTE AVRIL

WS review: Ripe and alluring, the soft edge though the core of gently mulled plum and blackberry fruit flavors is persistent here. Hints of ganache, alder and black tea weave in on the finish, where the fruit detail takes an encore. Best from 2021 through 2032. 3,333 cases made. From France.—James Molesworth

LAVAU

WS review: Juicy and ripe, featuring layers of plum, red currant and raspberry pâte de fruit flavors, lined liberally with sage, bay leaf and tobacco hints. Reveals a flash of brick dust on the finish, which shows good minerally cut. Very solid, with a pleasant old-school hint. Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre. Best from 2020 through 2030. 5,000 cases made. From France.—J.M.

OLGA RAFFAULT

WS review: Dark and developed, this red features integrated tannins on a well-knit structure, while acidity underscores the ripe dark berry fruit and imparts good energy. Savory herbal notes emerge on the long finish. Drink now through 2025. 1,000 cases imported. From France.—Aleks Zecevic

DOMAINE DE MOURCHON

Côtes du Rhône-Villages Séguret Grande Réserve 2015

WS review: Polished, with a beam of cassis and cherry preserves gliding through, with light floral and vanilla accents along the way. Has some sneaky length and depth too, with a kick of graphite hanging on through the finish. Drink now through 2021. 2,500 cases made. From France.—J.M.

GEORGES VIGOUROUX

Malbec Cahors Château de Mercuès 2016

WS review: A minerally undertone gives depth to the raspberry reduction and red plum compote flavors of this concentrated, focused red, with infusions of floral, tea and herb on the plush finish. Drink now through 2024. 8,500 cases made. From France.—Gillian Sciaretta.


Magazine Editor Graydon Carter Responds After Chef Bans Him from His Restaurants for No Showing

Chef Keith McNally slammed Air Mail founder and former Vanity Fair editor in chief Graydon Carter on social media after he didn't show up for a reservation at his New York City restaurant.

On Thursday, the 69-year-old restaurateur detailed the incident that took place this week at his restaurant Morandi.

McNally explained to his Instagram followers that Carter, 71, made a reservation for 12 people at 1 p.m. on Wednesday. Despite preparing extra staff to work Carter's two tables and leaving them available for an hour, McNally said he didn't show up and claimed he lost customers who couldn't be seated during the busy lunch hour.

"Around 2pm Graydon Carter's assistant called to say Mr. Carter wasn't coming, but the celebrated editor had forgotten to call and cancel," McNally wrote. "By forgetting to call and cancel his party of 12, Mr. Carter had upset the equilibrium of the restaurant, and cost the servers money in tips. (And had cost Morandi money too)."

Now, the chef has publicly banned Carter from returning to his restaurants after the inconvenience he said it caused him, also claiming that he's done the same thing three times at his other restaurants in the past.

"Perhaps, being something of a social bigwig, Mr. Carter thinks he is above having to cancel restaurant reservations," he continued. "But I'll tell you one thing. The fancy f— will never be allowed to make a reservation at one of my restaurants again. Never."

Carter, who had his hand in the Waverly Inn, Monkey Bar and Beatrice Inn in New York City, has since apologized, telling PEOPLE that he will be making a donation to make it right.

"My office did forget to cancel the lunch reservation until a bit after 1:30, which is wretched and we will be making a donation today to the restaurant's tip pool to cover what the staff would have made. As a fellow restaurateur I fully understand the implications of a large party no show," Carter said in a statement to PEOPLE.

He also called the lengthy post about the incident a "deranged rant" fueled by an Air Mail article about McNally's controversial social posts about Woody Allen and Ghislaine Maxwell's right to due process.

"As for the rest of McNally's deranged rant, it is pure fiction," said Carter. "I rarely eat at his places and this all stems from the story we did about his most recent Instagram controversies in last week's Air Mail."


Inside the Unapologetic Hedonism of NYC’s Glam Chef Angie Mar

Photo: courtesy Johnny Miller

Angie Mar is walking down the steps of her subterranean West Village restaurant, The Beatrice Inn. She&rsquos wearing a slip dress, a full-length fur coat, and nude Louboutin heels. There&rsquos a bottle of Champagne in one hand, and in the other a leash tethered to a taxidermied skunk.* &ldquoI thought to myself, if Salvador Dalí can walk around Paris with an anteater, I can absolutely walk into my own restaurant with a skunk,&rdquo Mar says.

Related

The skunk scene is not a common occurrence at The Beatrice Inn (or &ldquoBea&rdquo as Mar calls the restaurant), but the moment was memorialized for her debut cookbook Butcher + Beast, released on October 1 and photographed exclusively on Polaroid film by Johnny Miller. Also shot: Mar eating pasta while dressed in a red gown with a taxidermied boar&rsquos head in her lap Mar curled up in bed with truffled hen and leek pie, and former Food & Wine editor-in-chief Dana Cowin, also in a fur coat, chomping into the dry-aged Beatrice burger.

The book is a hedonist&rsquos collection of photographs and recipes. It&rsquos also a manifesto on craft, hard work, style and excess. Mar didn&rsquot dilute her world for consumers nor did she design the book for the four-letter-word-averse, restaurant critics, card-carrying members of PETA, incels or Mike Pence squares.

Mar may be the only chef I know who does not like vegetables, unless they&rsquore in service of meat. She abhors chicken and cooked fish, too. And she writes that after buying The Beatrice Inn from Graydon Carter in 2016, she implemented a &ldquozero fucks given&rdquo policy for 90 percent of her menu. The future would be authentic Mar, as carnal and over-the-top as she pleased.

The book was shot with a Polaroid camera. Photo: courtesy Johnny Miller

Dining at The Beatrice Inn is breathtakingly joyful if you submit, as I did last week, to eating fat sea scallops and trumpet mushrooms scented with peony, baked in puff pastry, and covered with sauce allemande and caviar. My table helped vanquish a whole rabbit smoked over Muscadet vines and packed with chestnut-giblet stuffing. We did eat vegetables: Kyoto carrots (&ldquobecause they&rsquore cute with the rabbit,&rdquo Mar says) and pommes Anna with crème fraîche and gorgonzola.

In 2019, critics have begun to push back on this indulgent brand of luxury, throw-back dining à la Tak Room, The Grill, and Bea. Do we really need spaces to make wealthy people feel comfortable and pampered? Do we need to champion restaurants that evoke eras when so many people were excluded from these centers of power? Mar answers with pheasant Périgord en croûte and crème brulée set in a marrow bone.

&ldquoHistory is important. No one is trying to celebrate exclusion. Chefs like Mario Carbone, Thomas Keller and myself are celebrating our history in food, and an era past. The Beatrice has been a part of New York for nearly 100 years. Why would we not celebrate its heritage and the impact that it has made on this city?&rdquo she says.

Mar&rsquos creative process relies on looking back, on visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art and burying herself in Escoffier. She cites Copacabana, The Great Gatsby, Sophia Loren in &ldquoLady Liberty,&rdquo Louis XV and Mary Queen of Scots as menu inspiration. She wields history skillfully and with purpose.

&ldquoI have always believed that in order to stay true to one&rsquos vision, it&rsquos best not to pay any mind to what&rsquos going on to the right or left of you. It&rsquos just a distraction,&rdquo she says. &ldquoI have never been afraid of a bit of controversy, and if I had been, The Beatrice would not be what it is today.&rdquo

The concept of family&mdashblood and chosen&mdashalso is paramount to Mar. The first time I visited the restaurant, right after Mar took over the kitchen, I ate and fell in love with her fork-tender, earthy and floral milk-braised pork shoulder. It&rsquos the first recipe in Butcher + Beast and a tribute to Sunday dinners with her family. Her father (who grew up in the restaurant business and died in 2018) and Pat LaFrieda (her mentor, friend and meat purveyor) loom large in the book. Mar also recounts cooking pasta for her brothers after her parents&rsquo divorce, eating Marie Callender pot pies with her mom and buying The Beatrice Inn with her cousin, Melissa Merrill Keary.

Chewing the fat with Angie Mar. Photo: Mark Mann

Mar, who notoriously does not share menu control with anyone, does share Butcher + Beast pages with her long-time sous chef Lucero Ramales, whose pozole is prized at staff meal. Antanas Samkus, Bea&rsquos bar director, contributed five cocktails to the book, and wine director Thera Clark and former beverage director Nathan Wooden, wrote essays on Champagne and Madeira, respectively.

Through the camp, Marlboros and dead animals, Butcher + Beast peels back the layers of Mar&rsquos emotional world. It also articulates her signature balance of masculine and feminine forms and flavors, best exemplified in dishes like the aforementioned milk-braised pork with fragrant jasmine rice soubise. Mar sees parallels with fashion: &ldquoI love dresses that embody a feminine silhouette, and also wear men&rsquos tuxedos if the mood strikes me, so shouldn&rsquot I be allowed to celebrate those notions on a plate, as well as in my wardrobe?&rdquo

The recipes&mdashmost of which are too complex for home cooks&mdashare reminders of Mar&rsquos devotion to craft. She&rsquos constantly experimenting with aging techniques, updating historic recipes, and pushing to make classic dishes one-of-a-kind-Mar. (Of her boudin noir, she writes, &ldquoThink Chanel.&rdquo)

For her 2019 autumn/winter menu, Mar found inspiration in Maria Grazia&rsquos Dior haute couture show. &ldquoIt was done exclusively in black, which I found to be fascinating. [The show] forced me to look at the details. The stitching. The craftmanship. And that&rsquos what food is, isn&rsquot it? It&rsquos the details and the craftsmanship that really make something sing,&rdquo she says.

Angie Mar sees more potential than most in a piece of meat, a basement restaurant, a night out in New York City&mdashand a cookbook project. You&rsquore welcome to join in. You just have to turn yourself over to the glamorous, gritty, romantic, uncompromising, and unapologetic world that is The Beatrice Inn and Butcher + Beast.

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article said the skunk was still alive and descented, but it was taxidermied.


Mar was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. [2] Before becoming a chef, she was based in Los Angeles as a real estate agent. [3] She moved to New York in 2010 and enrolled at the French Culinary Institute. [4] She subsequently worked at several restaurants in Brooklyn, including Reynard, Diner, and Marlow & Sons, before becoming sous-chef at The Spotted Pig. [5] [6] [7] In 2013, she became the fourth executive chef at The Beatrice Inn in Manhattan, owned by Vanity Fair writer Graydon Carter. [8] Mar appeared on Chopped in 2015, emerging as champion in its "Grill Masters" tournament and winning $50,000 in prize money. [4] [9]

In 2016, she and her cousin Melissa Merrill Keary bought over The Beatrice Inn. [2] According to Mar, the idea of a takeover was suggested by Carter and his associates. [10] Having previously given the restaurant zero stars out of four, The New York Times critic Pete Wells praised Mar's ability to transform The Beatrice Inn into "one of the most celebratory restaurants in the city" and awarded it two stars, meaning "very good". [11] In December 2016, Thrillist named Mar "NYC Chef of the Year for 2016". [12] Food & Wine listed her among the year's "Best New Chefs" in 2017. [13] In 2018, the International Culinary Center in New York—which Mar had graduated from in 2011—awarded her the Outstanding Alumni Award for Excellence in Culinary Arts. [14] Mar appeared on a cooking segment of Late Night with Seth Meyers in August 2018. [15]

In January 2019, a former bartender at The Beatrice Inn filed a lawsuit against Mar for alleged wage theft. [2] The lawsuit was voluntarily dismissed without prejudice. [16] Mar's first cookbook, Butcher + Beast, was published on September 30, 2019. [17] On May 11, 2020, Mar appeared on the telethon Rise Up New York! in support of New York residents affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. [18]

Mar's grandparents emigrated to the United States from China and her parents separated when she was 14. Her father, Roy, was a former naval officer and chef who worked at his sister Ruby Chow's Chinese restaurant in Seattle. [2] [4] He later became a dentist and died in 2018. [4] [6] Her mother, Nancy, was raised in both Taipei and England. [4] Mar has two younger brothers, [4] Chad and Conrad, [6] whose apparel company Autumn Studios partnered with The Beatrice Inn in late 2019 to produce a limited edition apparel for the restaurant. [19] [20]


THE WAVERLY INN: AN INTERVIEW WITH GRAYDON CARTER BY PETER FOGES

A former carriage house and tea room located in an 1844 brownstone in the heart of New York’s West Village on the corner of Bank Street and Waverly Place, it ranks in my view as one of the most charming and romantic restaurants in all of New York.

When my wife and I moved into Number 34 Bank Street in 1980, Number 16 on the corner contained a dusty local pub on the ground floor—good for a simple supper on a cold night. The food may have been modest, the wine poor, but we loved the uneven wooden floors, low ceilings, and blazing fires. It reeked of an older world.

One day Graydon Carter, the powerful editor of Vanity Fair , moved onto our block. Before long, he bought the old joint, turning it into a glamorous spot. He opened his version in 2006, leaving the historic décor mostly alone but adding features like cozy alcoves with red leather banquets, designed for conversation commissioning a stunning mural along one wall sprucing up the ivy-covered indoor patio at the back and conjuring a wonderful American menu full of comfort food.

But more than anything, he created buzz. Suddenly local stars like Robert De Niro, Calvin Klein, Gwyneth Paltrow, and others from uptown or the West Coast crowded the place, and lesser mortals were kept waiting or turned down. For a while, The Waverly Inn became an exclusive club. Today, the paparazzi are mostly gone from the sidewalk and the Waverly is calmer, though no less fun. Now you, too, can get in.

I recently asked my friend Graydon—lately retired from Vanity Fair —to tell me what it was like being the saloon keeper at The Waverly Inn, both then and now.

Peter Foges: The story goes, you move downtown to Bank Street, a beautiful 1840s Greenwich Village block. A few doors from your home you find this fabled but faded landmark—Ye Olde Waverly Inn—a dusty restaurant rumored to be haunted. Legend has it the epiphany to acquire it came you one night at Elaine’s. But you were an editor, for heaven’s sake, not a saloon keeper or a chef. What on earth possessed you to create a hangout (with the stiffest martinis) for a New York crowd—a kind of Chasen’s on the right coast of the country—a hangout for our time?

Graydon Carter: I was having dinner at Elaine’s with Roberto Benabib, a friend and a television show-runner who lives about 25 feet south of The Waverly Inn. (I live about 25 feet west of the restaurant.) On my way uptown, I noticed a FOR SALE sign in the window of the restaurant and mentioned this to Roberto over dinner. Perhaps it was the wine or just post-youthful exuberance, but we decided we should buy it. In the morning, we felt much the same, which was a good sign. We also came to the morning-after realization that neither of us had a clue as to how to actually run a restaurant. So we brought in partners, Eric Goode and Sean MacPherson, and we bought the place.

PF: Ed Sorel of The New Yorker did the famous mural that adorns the wall—a magical rogues’ gallery of Village bohemians, demimondaines, stars, and old revolutionaries. Why the idea, why these particular people, and why Ed?

GC: The Waverly had been around forever—and indeed back in the ’30s, it had once been owned by the secretary to Clare Booth, when she was the deputy editor to Frank Crowninshield at Vanity Fair . Everybody who had lived in Greenwich Village had been through that front door at one point or another.

I like a mural in a restaurant. It tells the diners’ story back to them. At that point in time in the Village, you were hard put to find an American restaurant. It was all Italian in those days. We wanted comfort food, white table cloths, red leather banquets—a rarity downtown then—and a mural of the Greenwich Village all-stars: Edmund Wilson, William Burroughs, Anaïs Nin, Dorothy Parker, and so forth. There are four working fireplaces in the restaurant and a classic bar. This would be an American restaurant, with a post-war sensibility. And who else to paint the mural but the dean of American illustrators, Ed Sorel?

PF: “Exclusive,” they said at the start. A “club” for A-listers. Myths abounded about how to get in. What are the rules? What is the pecking order? And has it changed? (Urban legend had it the ravishing garden room at the back was your version of “Siberia”—an annex for the “unknown.”)

GC: There were never any rules at the beginning, except we didn’t want large tables of noisy bankers, regardless of how much money they had to spend. So we tended not to pick up the reservation line when a 203-area code popped up—203 being the area code for Greenwich, Connecticut, the day home for much of the hedge fund industry. That was pretty simple. It was an is a bit tough to get in, but once in, we work hard to treat everyone like kings and queens.

PF: Let’s talk food. Your menu is full of comfort dishes most people love. Perfect crab cakes, chicken pot pie, Dover sole (what in the world is better?), halibut served with English garden peas, and your “signature truffled mac ’n’ cheese. Did you dream up this divine feast done to perfection, paired with the best wines—and how’s it changed over time?

GC: The chicken pot pie was the house specialty long before we took it over. Our first chef, John DeLucie, modernized the old recipe and just made it better. Everything else grew out of the desire for good American grub on a cold winter’s night. Our wine stewards, led by our operating partner Emil Varda, handle the list.

PF: Trump, of course, has been a sparring partner of yours since you mocked his short fingers in Spy . He has dubbed you “dopey Graydon Carter—the desperate restaurant man.” And, in fact, you proudly print his disparaging tweet at the head of the menu: “The Waverly Inn has the worst food in the city.” Has he ever tasted it?

GC: Trump hasn’t actually tasted the food, so like so many of his pronouncements, it’s based on nothing. After we called Trump Grill in Trump Towers possibly “the worst restaurant in America” in Vanity Fair , Trump sent his son Eric and Eric’s wife down to case the Waverly. It was a good, bustling night and I sat them at one of the prime booths. Emil made sure they were treated like friends of the house. I wanted Eric’s father to get the news that the restaurant wasn’t going away anytime soon.

PF: Joints and hot scenes—Maxime’s in Paris, Chasen’s in Hollywood, the “21” Club—they all become classics in the end. Has The Waverly Inn reached that point? Are the paparazzi still outside? The regulars at the bar? Can folks get in?

GC: It was always intended as a neighborhood place. And on any given night I see three or four locals—from our own block—eating there.

PF: Are there moments, highs , in your low-slung saloon you especially remember? A wedding? A wake? A row? A new venture? The start of a beautiful friendship?

GC: To be honest, I’ve never had a bad evening at the Waverly. We’re not open for lunch, but after the memorial for Christopher Hitchens at Cooper Union, we opened the restaurant for the whole day and maybe a hundred of those who attended the service stayed, many through midnight and beyond. A majority of Christopher’s friends were English, and the food and drink were on the house, so you can only imagine.

PF: Now you’ve “done” it—what’s the secret? In Casablanca , “everyone” came to Rick’s. In New York, “everyone” comes to Graydon’s, or wants to. Sure, it’s the usual trio: food, service, décor. But it’s clearly more. An “X” factor that makes Waverly truly memorable. The lighting, perhaps? Or the host?

GC: I have not the faintest idea what makes a restaurant successful. If I had to guess, I’d say an inviting atmosphere, great food, drink, and service, and a collection of customers who share the same love of talk and good company.

The Waverly Inn is located in the West Village at 16 Bank Street T. 917 828-1154


Watch the video: Essen mit Oliver u0026 Patricia. Waldviertler Hof (January 2022).