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5 Edible Souvenirs From Paris

5 Edible Souvenirs From Paris

Bring back a taste of Paris with one of these edible souvenirs

Chocolate From Choco-Story : Le Musée Gourmand du Chocolat

In the center of Paris, on the Boulevard de Bonne Nouvelle, is a well-kept Parisian secret, Le the chocolate museum. Visitors do everything from stirring the chocolate to pouring it in the molds to learning about the cocoa bean (all while wearing a fancy white chef hat), and leave the museum perfectly satisfied, a bag of complimentary chocolate in one hand and a gift from the gift shop in the other. We recommend the chocolate roses sold in the gift shop as well as the rich and delectable hot chocolate. The former may be used as a souvenir while the latter is best served as a personal reward.

La Chambre aux Confitures

In the Marais neighborhood is a confiture and miel shop (jam and honey) called . Although one can easily find jam and honey in a variety of locations sells very refined and delicate delicacies. From apricot and pineapple to raspberry with a hint of rose petal, the assortment of jams is mind-blowing and, if you're in a rush, it's possible to become overwhelmed. With an extremely helpful member of the staff on duty at all times, every visitor is offered unlimited samples… ! If that doesn’t convince you, the pretty brown paper gift wrap may sway you in the right direction! One last hint: Try the mint-infused jams — you won’t regret it!

Wine

iStockphoto/thinkstock

Any respectable food store in Paris will sell wine (even the not-so-respectable ones, actually). If you are looking to surprise a loved one with a delicious French wine, go with bordeaux. Or if your particular loved one has more of a sweet tooth, there are many fruit-infused wines (such as grapefruit) sold for fairly cheap in every . There are some regulations regarding transporting alcohol in airplanes, however, because wine has an alcohol content of less than 24 percent, you should have no trouble checking it. Just remember: pack glass bottles safely in your clothing!

Cheese

Le fromage… need we say more ? Go to a market in the early morning (in Paris "early morning" can mean 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.) and get yourself a nice block of Camembert or Comté. The only problem with bringing cheese back for your loved ones is the refrigeration aspect. You may want to invest in a thermal bag in order to keep the cheese refrigerated over the course of the flight.

Macaron

A macarons is the classic pastry of Paris. The macaron will delight your senses and make the recipient of this gift especially jealous of your adventures in the European capital. You can get good macarons in any patisserie in Paris, but if you want to bring home the pastry in a brand-name plastic bag, head over to Ladurée, where you’ll find a large variety of options. Just be careful that you buy them at most a day or two before your flight (macarons don’t taste good stale).


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


Five Tasty, Edible Gifts That Are Easy to Make

A good food gift doesn’t need to be an expensive gourmet gift basket, but it should be thoughtful, delicious, and a little unexpected. These edible and drinkable presents are thoughtful and customizable, and will make your gift stand out in a sea of boring fruitcakes.

Super Flavorful Custom Salts

Sure, you can buy fancy flavored salt for way too much money, or you could make your own little sampler pack on the cheap with flavors as unique as your wonderful brain. Almost any flavor—from coffee to lemon-ginger—can be reimagined as a salt, you just have to know how to prepare them.

Give Your Dishes a Savory Boost with These Homemade Flavored Salts

Regular, plain ol’ sodium chloride is pretty great, but I have a soft spot for flavored salt, which

If you’re flavorings are dry (think herbs, spices, and dried fruits and vegetables) you’ll need a food processor (or a mortar and pestle) and 1-2 teaspoons of your dried tasty add-ins for every ¼ cup of salt. If you’re drying something like lemon zest yourself, just pop it in the oven at 200 ℉ until it’s completely dry. Pulse your add-ins in the food processor (or crush them using your mortar and pestle) until you have little flavorful bits that are about the size of a grain of salt. Then mix them up with your favorite sodium chloride in a small bowl. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside for at least twenty four hours to let the flavors meld. Scoop your new flavored salt into cute, festive jars, label them, and give them to your foodiest friends. Flavored salts retain their flavor for up to a year, but they probably won’t make it that long.

If you need some ideas to get your creative juices flowing, try one or more of these:

  • Lemon Ginger: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lemon zest + ½ teaspoon dried ginger root
  • Tomato Basil: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried basil + ½ teaspoon dried, chopped sundried tomatoes
  • Ancho Chili and Lime: ¼ cup salt + ½ teaspoon dried lime zest + ½ teaspoon dried dried ancho chilis

If you wish to flavor your salty crystals with your most favorite wet condiment (hot sauce, hoisin sauce, BBQ sauce, any damn sauce), they will need to spend a bit of time in the oven. Just combine 1 tablespoon of flavor-packed liquid with ½ a cup of salt and stir until completely combined (leave no white patches). Spread the mixture out on a baking sheet lined with parchment and pop it in the oven for two hours at 170°F, stirring frequently. Store your creation in an airtight container for up to a year.

Making salt flavored with your favorite wine or liquor is a similar process, you just have to make a reduction first. Pour out three cups of booze for every cup of salt you’ll be making, and cook down into a thick viscous syrup. Stir the syrup into the salt and dry it out in the oven as described above.

Better Than Instant Hot Chocolate

‘Tis the season for warm, chocolatey beverages, and you definitely don’t want to give sad packets of Swiss Miss. There are two ways to make your own, upgraded instant hot chocolate, and both are pretty easy to execute. The first, which is featured in the video above, only calls for three ingredients: 12 ounces of your favorite semisweet chocolate ( aim for something between 60% and 80% ), one cup of heavy cream, and a ¼ teaspoon of salt. Microwave for about two minutes, stir, and repeat until everything is completely combined. Cover the mixture and refrigerate until firm. Once it’s scoopable, shape into little morsels and wrap each one in plastic wrap. (Alternate red and green plastic wrap for extra Christmas-y cheer, or use blue if your intended is celebrating Hanukkah.) Place the single servings in a large mason jar, and gift away, ensuring the giftee understands that this gift must be kept in the fridge.

Make Your Own Cocoa Powder for Fast Chocolatey Drinks Anywhere You Go

If you love chocolate milk, or just a little chocolatey flavor stirred into your coffee from time…

If you’d rather give a more shelf-stable, powdery iteration of hot chocolate , do not despair: we’ve got one of those too. Like the hot chocolate above, this recipe also has a mere three ingredients. Just combine ⅔ cup of sugar with ⅓ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder (you can get really fancy here) with a pinch of salt and store in an airtight container. If you want to get super festive, you can take it up a notch by adding cinnamon, cloves, ginger, allspice, or even cayenne for a sweet and spicy kick. (Earn even more extra credit by including a bottle of red wine for mixing in .)


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