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Mashed Kohlrabi with Brown Butter

Mashed Kohlrabi with Brown Butter

It's a pain, but you have to peel the kohlrabi for this recipe. Take off enough of the purple or green skin to reveal the inner white flesh.

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 pound russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 pounds kohlrabies, peeled, cut into ½-inch pieces

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat butter in a small saucepan over medium. Cook hazelnuts until butter foams, then browns, about 5 minutes. Add thyme sprigs and cook until crisp, about 30 seconds. Immediately transfer to a bowl; spoon out nuts and coarsely chop.

  • Meanwhile, place potatoes in a large pot and pour in cold water to cover by 1". Season with salt; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until very tender, 10–12 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Return water to a simmer; cook kohlrabies until tender, 12–14 minutes. Drain and add to bowl with potatoes.

  • Heat cream in a small saucepan over medium until warm.

  • Pass potatoes and kohlrabies through potato ricer or food mill into a large bowl (alternatively, you can also use a masher). Stir in brown butter and warm cream; season with salt. Top mash with hazelnuts and crumble fried thyme over.

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 460 Fat (g) 32 Saturated Fat (g) 16 Cholesterol (mg) 70 Carbohydrates (g) 41 Dietary Fiber (g) 5 Total Sugars (g) 8 Protein (g) 9 Sodium (mg) 600Reviews Section

Mashed Potato Pancakes

When I am going through periods of stress in my life, the food I want most is anything made with a potato.

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day.

I’m not Irish but will use any excuse to eat Irish food, which, despite the outcries of surprise from my Irish friends, is quite wonderful (fresh salmon, fabulous oatmeal, spectacular bread and the best potatoes ever).

I’ve been to Ireland a few times and have eaten mashed potato pancakes there, although I’ve never seen them crusted with panko it’s usually plain old bread crumbs on the outside.

You can use either I like the texture of panko better.

Mashed potato pancakes are very soft, so be careful when placing them in the pan and turning them.

These make a good side dish, but also a meal if you top them with a fried egg or two.

Mashed Potato Pancakes

3 cups cold mashed potatoes

2 chopped fresh scallions or 3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 cup panko or bread crumbs, approximately

5-6 tablespoons vegetable oil

Place the mashed potatoes, egg, scallions, 1/3 cup bread crumbs and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl and mix thoroughly to blend all the ingredients. Shape the mixture into patties about 1/2-inch thick and refrigerate for at least one hour. Place the panko on a dish, then press each patty into the panko to coat both sides. Patties are very soft and fragile, so work carefully. Heat 2-3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a saute pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, fry a few of the potato cakes for about 3 minutes per side, or until crispy. Be sure to leave room in the pan with space between each pancake. Repeat with the remaining potato cakes, adding more oil to the pan as needed.


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Can You Mash It: Mashed Vegetable Recipes

Combine 2 1/2 pounds whole unpeeled beets and 1 large unpeeled russet potato in a pot cover with cold water. Bring to a boil and cook until soft, about 45 minutes drain. Peel the beets and potato and puree with 3 tablespoons butter season with salt. Top with horseradish sauce.

Celery Root Mash

Peel and roughly chop 3 pounds celery root. Place in a pot and cover with equal parts milk and water (about 2 1/2 cups each) add a pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer and cook until soft, 20 to 25 minutes drain. Puree with 1/3 cup heavy cream and 2 tablespoons butter. Season with salt, then add 2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard and pulse to combine.

Butternut Squash Mash

Halve 1 large unpeeled butternut squash (about 3 pounds) and cut into thick wedges, discarding the seeds. Toss with olive oil and roast at 400 degrees F until soft, 35 to 45 minutes. Remove the skin. Puree the squash with 3 tablespoons butter season with salt. Warm a few tablespoons of maple syrup with a pinch of cayenne pepper drizzle over the mash.

Rutabaga Mash

Peel and roughly chop 3 pounds rutabagas. Place in a pot and cover with equal parts milk and water (about 2 1/2 cups each) add a pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer and cook until soft, 20 to 25 minutes drain. Puree with 1/2 cup heavy cream and 2 tablespoons butter. Cook a few sliced garlic cloves and some fresh rosemary in olive oil drizzle over the mash.

Kohlrabi Mash

Peel and quarter 2 pounds kohlrabi. Cook in boiling salted water until soft, about 30 minutes drain. Puree with 2 tablespoons each heavy cream and butter season with salt and pepper. Drizzle with olive oil and top with chopped parsley.

Turnip Mash

Peel and roughly chop 3 pounds turnips. Place in a pot and cover with equal parts milk and water (about 2 1/2 cups each) add a pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer and cook until soft, 20 to 25 minutes drain. Puree with 1/4 cup heavy cream and 2 tablespoons butter. Season with salt and top with crumbled cooked bacon.

Carrot Mash

Peel and roughly chop 2 pounds carrots. Cook in boiling salted water until soft, about 20 minutes drain. Puree with 3 tablespoons olive oil season with salt and pepper. Warm 1 tablespoon olive oil with 1 teaspoon each grated ginger and orange zest drizzle over the mash.

Kabocha Squash Mash

Peel and roughly chop 1 large kabocha squash (about 3 pounds), discarding the seeds. Cook in boiling salted water until soft, about 20 minutes reserve 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid, then drain. Puree the squash and the reserved liquid with 1/4 cup heavy cream season with salt and pepper. Top with toasted pepitas.

Cauliflower Mash

Chop off the florets from 1 large head cauliflower and place them in a steamer basket set in a pot filled with 1 inch boiling water. Cover and steam until soft, about 20 minutes. Puree the cauliflower with 3 tablespoons butter, a pinch of nutmeg, and salt to taste. Fry sage leaves in a few tablespoons butter pour over the mash.

Parsnip Mash

Peel and roughly chop 2 pounds parsnips. Cook in boiling salted water until soft, about 20 minutes drain. Puree with 3 tablespoons butter season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with grated parmesan.


Turnips

Turnips, an often under-appreciated vegetable, are actually more versatile than most people give them credit for. The leaves are edible and can be prepared like other greens. The root (the turnip itself) can be boiled, mashed, stir fried, or used raw in something like a salad.

They are a good source of vitamin C and potassium. They are available fresh year round in most places, but if you can't find them you can substitute rutabaga, parsnips or kohlrabi in these recipes.

Carrots, turnips, and parsnips are oven roasted until tender for a delicious side dish to any meal.

Method: oven
Time: 30-60 minutes

Made with black pepper, turnips, onion, salt, water, light cream, butter, potatoes

Method: crock pot
Time: over 5 hours

Did you know that turnips were popular in the middle ages? They fell out of fashion when the potato became popular in the 18th century.

Method: stovetop
Time: under 30 minutes

What ingredient is better suited to an Amish recipe than the humble turnip? This recipe showcases the root veggie in a creamy gratin without being too show-offy.

Method: oven
Time: 30-60 minutes

Made with eggs, white pepper, salt, turnips, potatoes, butter, sugar

Method: oven
Time: 30-60 minutes

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Made with salt and freshly ground black pepper, lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, turnips, Swiss chard, lemon zest

Method: stovetop
Time: under 30 minutes

Made with oil, orange, butter, turnips, salt and pepper, brown sugar

Method: oven
Time: under 30 minutes

Made with thyme, honey, butter, carrots, turnips, salt

Method: stovetop
Time: under 30 minutes

Made with turnips, salt, water, rice vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, fresh ginger, garlic, scallions

Made with paprika, parsley, turnips, butter, flour, salt, pepper, milk, sharp cheddar cheese

Method: oven, stovetop
Time: 30-60 minutes

Made with water, salt, ground cumin seed, soy sauce, tofu cake, corn or peanut oil, onion, rutabaga, tomato, fresh hot green chili

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Time: under 30 minutes

Made with eggs, turnip, butter, salt, black pepper, sugar, flour, rosemary

Method: oven
Time: 30-60 minutes

Made with bread crumbs, turnips, applesauce, brown sugar, salt, butter, eggs, black pepper

Method: oven, stovetop
Time: 30-60 minutes

Made with red pepper flakes, turnip greens with turnips, smoked turkey breast, onion

Method: stovetop
Time: 30-60 minutes

Made with sharp Cheddar cheese, plain bread crumbs, turnip roots, paprika, salt, black pepper, sugar, butter, flour, cream or half & half

Method: oven, stovetop
Time: 30-60 minutes

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Method: oven
Time: 1-2 hours

Made with butter, fresh herbs, black pepper, leeks, olive oil, onion, garlic, turnips, salt


How does kohlrabi taste like?

When eaten raw (my favorite way of eating it) it is sweet and very crunchy and fresh, a bit like radish but milder and very much sweeter, a mixture between radish and cabbage, I would say.

When cooked the taste becomes more delicate, the freshness of kohlrabi is replaced by a wonderful tenderness, the sweetness remains but more subtle, gentler. I think cooked kohlrabi needs to be paired with stronger flavors, otherwise the finished dish might be too delicate, maybe quite a bit bland.


Recipe Summary

  • 6 kohlrabi, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream
  • salt to taste
  • ground white pepper to taste

Place a steamer insert into a saucepan and fill with water to just below the bottom of the steamer. Bring water to a boil. Add kohlrabi, cover, and steam until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Reserve cooking water.

Melt butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Whisk in flour and stir until the mixture becomes paste-like and light golden brown, about 5 minutes. Gradually whisk the kohlrabi cooking water into the flour mixture, and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook and stir until thickened, about 5 minutes. Add parsley. Stir in heavy cream. Add kohlrabi season with salt and pepper.


Fresh Corn Salad

Ingredients

  • 5 ears of corn, shucked
  • 1⁄2 cup small-diced red onion (1 small onion)
  • 3 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons good olive oil
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1⁄2 cup julienned fresh basil leaves

In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the corn for 3 minutes until the starchiness is just gone. Drain and immerse it in ice water to stop the cooking and to set the color. When the corn is cool, cut the kernels off the cob, cutting close to the cob.

Toss the kernels in a large bowl with the red onions, vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Just before serving, toss in the fresh basil. Taste for seasonings and serve cold or at room temperature.


How to Make Irish Bangers and Colcannon

With all of the ingredients prepped in advance and with three pans working simultaneously on the stove, I methodically moved through how I envisioned making the recipe in my brain:

  1. Boil potatoes until fork-tender.
  2. Sauté bacon in a large skillet. Add chopped cabbage and butter to bacon and cook until the cabbage is soft.
  3. Brown bangers in another large skillet. Add Guinness to the pan and braise the bangers.
  4. Remove the bangers and add some flour to the sauce to make gravy.
  5. Mash potatoes and add to the cabbage.

And then, all of a sudden, the dish was finished!

The end result of this classic Irish dish is something I am truly proud of. Recreating bangers and colcannon from the ground – up without a recipe was one thing.

It was another to make it great enough to pass Kyle’s test (which, by far, it did).

And it’s entirely another thing to fully and wholeheartedly say that I love this bangers and colcannon meal. I couldn’t get enough of it for dinner last night and will ashamedly admit, as only a food blogger could to an audience of people I don’t really know, that I overstuffed myself.

The colcannon was awesome, though how could it not be with bacon in it?

The dreaded cabbage was unassuming, ever so slightly crisp, and its contrast in texture with the mashed potatoes was perfect. I never dreamed that a beer reduction cooked with brown sugar could be so amazing and it was the brown sugar gravy that completely put the whole dish over the edge.

I hope that you’ll try this classic bangers and colcannon dish in your own home and let me know how it turns out for you in the comment section below!


10 Tasty Ways to Prepare Kohlrabi

You’ve probably spotted knobby purple or green kohlrabi at the farmers market recently and wondered what the heck this odd-shaped thing with the weird name is! Well, it’s a fantastically versatile vegetable with a taste and texture somewhere between cabbage and broccoli stems.

From noodles to salads and slaws to fritters to stir-fries, and more, there’s no shortage of ways to put this vegetable to work. We think that it’s time for kohlrabi to step up and take a more prominent place in our cooking, and here are our 10 favorite kohlrabi recipes.