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8 Irish Whiskies Beyond Jameson Slideshow

8 Irish Whiskies Beyond Jameson Slideshow

Bushmills

Bushmill's, the biggest Irish whiskey you've never heard of, is as standard an Irish whiskey as you can get. Bushmills is triple distilled in pot stills from an un-peated malted barley mash, a typical mix you'll find in an Irish whiskey. And like most Irish whiskies, Bushmill's offers a range of blended and single malt whiskies for everyone. While the standard Bushmill's is as close to a Jameson as you can get, the other offerings are what gets everyone excited.The Bushmill's Black is aged in bourbon and sherry casks for a blast of velvety fruit notes, while the 10-year old has a lighter fruit taste and is the easy drinker of the bunch. The 21-year old malt takes the sherry and bourbon-aged whiskies and blends the malts in a madeira-infused cask for a truly unique whiskey, with dark chocolate and toffee notes.

Clontarf 1014 Irish Whiskey

Clontarf 1014 (named for the historic Battle of Clontarf in 1014) is a bold and smooth Irish Whiskey, triple distilled, aged in bourbon barrels and blended to perfection. Masterfully crafted from the best Irish ingredients and mellowed through Atlantic Irish Oak charcoal, Clontarf is smooth, full flavored and perfectly balanced.

Connemara Peated Single Malt Whiskey

For those of you who love a good peated whiskey, you'll love Connemara. The whiskey is inspired by the island of Connemara's ancient distilling tradition of drying malted barley over peated fires. That gives the whiskey a rare flavor profile: a smooth Irish whiskey taste matched with the complexity of a typical Islay peated whisky. You'll still get a honey sweet and silky taste to start, with an end note of full-bodied peat, chocolate, vanilla, and oak.

Greenore Single Grain Irish Whiskey

It's the world's only Irish single grain whiskey, distilled from corn in continuous column still and aged for eight years in bourbon barrels. That translates to an easy-sipping, versatile whiskey that has hints of bourbon — making it the natural companion or mixing spirit for your Irish whiskies.

Knappogue Castle

Knappogue Castle is a family tradition of exceptional quality Irish single malts. Mark Edwin Andrews, the first modern-day owner of the 15th century Knappogue Castle in County Clare, Ireland, followed his passion. First, he restored Knappogue Castle to perfection, then he turned his passion to bottling exceptional quality single malt Irish whiskies. He was bottling single malt Irish whiskey when everyone else was bottling blends. He's also the man behind the extremely rare Knappogue Castle 1951. But what can you find on your own Knappogue Castle? The 12-year old single malt has a bright, light lemon-orange color (no caramel coloring is added) and a mildly spicy, citrus taste. The 14-year old is rich and fruity with hints of green apple and grapefruit zest, with vanilla notes from the charred oak cask it's aged in.

Michel Collins Irish Whiskies

Michael Collins Irish Whiskeys are proudly handcrafted at the Cooley Distillery. Recognized by Malt Advocate as “2010 Distillery of the Year” and as “European Distillery of the Year” for the last three consecutive years by the International Wine and Spirit Competition Awards, Cooley is the only distillery in Ireland to double distill their whiskeys and use peated malted barley. Made with locally harvested Spring barley, Michael Collins Irish Whiskeys are distilled with local mountain spring water that is soft and pure and matured in small bourbon seasoned casks where the cool, moist Irish air brings the whiskeys to maturity. The blended whiskey is double distilled and then matured in bourbon seasoned casks from four to twelve years. The result? A whiskey with aromas of honey, citrus and malt give way to a delicate balance of these flavors with a fresh oak finish. The 10-year old single malt, on the other hand, is a surprisingly complex whiskey. It's double distilled in small, long-necked copper pot stills, from both malted barley and peated malted barley and matured in small bourbon seasoned casks for a minimum of 10 years. The result is a single malt, with a slightly sweet nose, that is rich and complex with hints of ripe fruit, meadow flowers and peat.

Redbreast

When Redbreast Irish whiskies came back to the forefront of the Irish whiskey market, the whole world took notice. Enter in the Redbreast 12-year old cask strength, the winner of the Whisky Advocate's 2012 Irish Whiskey of the Year. Wrote Dominic Roskrow of the whiskey: "A rich, bittersweet plummy, red berry, oaky-spiced delight, the increased strength gives an already great whiskey a richer, fuller, fruitier dimension, and makes an already complex whiskey…even more complex. For me that makes it not just the best Irish whiskey of this year, but of any. An utter joy." This four-pot, three times distilled, and chill-proofed whiskey is one to always be on the look out for.

Tyrconnell Single Malt Irish Whiskey

The all pot-still whiskey made from barley offers a smooth flavor with a complex character. It's got the oily sweetness with a tang of oranges and lemons, with a full, citrus, and spicy aroma that makes it stands out from other Irish whiskies. (And, fun fact: the whiskey is named after a famous racehorse hat won the Irish Classic at 100 to one odds.)


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.


Experts Share 8 Ways to Drink Irish Whiskey on St. Patrick’s Day

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, we have Irish whiskey on the brain. So we asked local spirits gurus to share some ideas on how to drink it. Read on for cocktail recipes, special drinks, and more. Sorry in advance about your Monday morning hangover.

1) Go on a flight.

Here’s an idea: If you’re having a St. Paddy’s party, why not offer guests the opportunity to try a flight of Irish whiskeys? We asked Bill Thomas, who keeps an enormous collection of whiskeys at Jack Rose Dining Saloon (where he is planning a blowout rooftop party on St. Paddy’s), to pick three bottles that would work well. “I chose these three because they represent three different styles and ages,” says Thomas. He likes to finish with the Jameson 18-Year since the brand is familiar to people. “The 18-Year has a richer palate,” he explains. Check out his tasting notes below.

Bushmills Black Bush, a blended Irish whiskey
Nose: malt, spice, toffee
Palate: oak, spices, raisins

Redbreast 12-Year-Old
Nose: fruity and oaky
Palate: vanilla, spices, oak

Jameson 18-Year-Old Limited Reserve
Nose: oak, honey, leather
Palate: cereal, vanilla, caramel


2) Drink some liquid luck.

At the Eddy Bar at Hank’s on the Hill and Buffalo & Bergen in Union Market, Gina Chersevani is offering a special cocktail through the end of the month. Called the Lucky One, it costs $7 and combines Jameson with lemon, ginger, and Harp beer.


3) Make An Irish Parrott.

“You can name it,” Jake Parrott, the regional brand manager for spirits importer Haus Alpenz, told us when he shared this simple recipe for a refreshing St. Patrick’s Day cocktail. Okay then, we’re calling it the Irish Parrott. He suggests using John L. Sullivan Irish whiskey.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
1 ounce Dolin Blanc vermouth
½ ounce lemon juice
Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients in a glass full of ice, stir, and serve. (We’d probably add a lemon twist for garnish).


4) Try an Irish mojito.

Matt Perkins, the bar manager at Cedar in Penn Quarter, subs Jameson for rum to create the Dirty Mojito, with lemon juice, mint, and honey from his brother-in-law’s West Virginia farm. It’s $11 and available all the time.


5) Get scrappy.

At her Union Market shop Salt & Sundry, Amanda McClements stocks a collection of cocktail products that are almost too pretty to use. But if you can bring yourself to break into the Morris Kitchen ginger syrup and Scrappy’s fragrant cardamom bitters, try her recipe for a whiskey and ginger cocktail.

1½ ounces Irish whiskey
½ ounce Morris Kitchen ginger syrup
Club soda or seltzer
Scrappy’s cardamom bitters

Pour the whiskey and ginger syrup over ice in a rocks glass. Top with club soda and two drops of cardamom bitters. Stir once or twice to mix, and enjoy.


6) Wait a day.

Estadio bar manager Adam Bernbach has a St. Paddy’s tradition: He likes to put an Irish whiskey cockail on the menu the day after the holiday. Head out on the 18th and ask him to make you a Too Little, Too Late: Jameson 12-Year-Old, Cardamaro, black tea syrup, and lemon juice.


7) Booze like a bartender.

Everyone knows bartenders like beer backs—a.k.a boilermakers—so we recently asked Quarry House Tavern bar manager Gordon Banks to share some of his favorite beer-and-Irish-whiskey combos. He went above and beyond with a blind staff tasting. Try one (or two) of the resulting pairs on St. Paddy’s.

Chartreuse gives a drink called the Tipperary a festive green hue. Back when she was bar manager at Jack Rose, Rachel Sergi showed us how to make a perfect rendition.

Get Our “Brunches This Weekend” Newsletter

The best breakfasts and brunches to try every weekend, plus our most popular food stories of the week.