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Peanut Butter & Jelly Soft Serve

Peanut Butter & Jelly Soft Serve

Bozhena Melnyk/Shutterstock

This recipe will make you feel nostalgic and bring back good memories of eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for lunch. But now you can enjoy this treat in ice cream form.

Recipe courtesy of the Institute of Culinary Education

Notes

This recipe is just a jumping off point too – those making this at home can mix and match to make their favorite, you essentially need 10 oz. frozen fruit of choice, ½ cup dairy or dairy alternative of choice and 1 tsp mix-in.

Ingredients

  • 10 Ounces Frozen raspberries
  • 1/2 Cup Almond milk
  • 6 Tablespoons Sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon Peanut butter

PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


PB&J rugelach bring the sweet, salty taste of Jewish-American nostalgia

Let’s just get this out of the way: I have a lot of opinions about Hanukkah desserts. First, gelt is disgusting. It’s the worst kind of chocolate: waxy, soft, and unbearably sweet. Thanks but no thanks. If gelt is the prize that’s on the line in a game of dreidel, then I am entirely uninterested in playing.

Sufganiyot (aka jelly doughnuts) are certainly delicious, but on a holiday where everything is deep fried in oil to symbolize the lamp that miraculously burned for eight days (we Jews seriously love us some symbolism), it’s just too much for me. After standing over a hot stove frying latkes for hours, the last thing I want to do is keep it going with some jelly doughnuts. The person who shows up to a Hanukkah potluck with homemade sufganiyot is the true hero of Hanukkah . Keep that friend near and dear, and never let them go.

So what does that leave us with? Well, let me state on the record that a sugar cookie in the shape of a Jewish star or a dreidel does not count as a Hanukkah dessert. It’s just a festive cookie. In grade school when we’d celebrate the holidays, teachers would try to make the celebrations as inclusive as possible (public school, baby!) by offering menorah-shaped cookie cutters. Even then, I wasn’t fooled by this lazy attempt at inclusivity. Hanukkah sugar cookies are a creation of gentiles. There is nothing traditional or authentically Jewish about them. Sure, they’re cute to look at and fun to decorate, but I would not categorize them as a Hanukkah dessert.

Therefore, I have no other option but to crown rugelach the superior dessert of Hanukkah. These tasty little cookies are made with a cream cheese dough that is filled with a fruit, nut, or chocolate filling, then rolled up into a sweet treat. The great thing about rugelach is that they’re just as fun to eat as they are to make. Rolling and slicing the dough is cheaper than therapy but nearly as effective.

And the filling options are endless. Salty-sweet desserts are my love language. What better union of these two magical flavor profiles than peanut butter and jelly? And I’m not talking about all-natural nut butter and fancy fruit preserves. I’m talking about the good stuff: Jif creamy peanut butter and Welch’s concord grape jelly. If a PB&J sandwich doesn’t bring me back to the elementary school cafeteria table and the stress of trying to successfully make a lunch trade, then I simply don’t want it.


Watch the video: Smooth PB u0026 J Sandwich - peanut butter and jelly jelly recipe (December 2021).