New recipes

America's Best Golf Resort Restaurants Slideshow

America's Best Golf Resort Restaurants Slideshow

1) Bellatrix at the Classic Club - Palm Desert, CA

Executive chef Gerard Brunett at Bellatrix uses Mediterranean influences coupled with an extensive wine list to offer a unique menu that features "excellent yet simplistic food," including dishes like Kurobota pork loin with spinach and sweet corn, and sesame-glazed salmon. A covered terrace offers fantastic views of the Arnold Palmer-designed course, which held the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic for three consecutive years from 2006 to 2008.

2) The Café Pacific at Trump National Golf Club - Rancho Palos Verdes, CA

It cost more than $250 million to design this palatial course, but that should come as no surprise due to its association with the Trump brand. Also not surprising is that Trump hired such a high-caliber chef to head the course's restaurant. After spending years working in respected restaurants in France, Spain, Morocco, and Italy, executive chef Jean-Pierre Vincent brought his talent to the West Coast, where he developed his Mediterranean-inspired menu around the freshest imported ingredients. Dinner guests at The Café Pacific can indulge in such specialties as a seafood tagine or homemade eggplant Parmesan.

3) Pèppoli at Pebble Beach Resorts - Pebble Beach, Calif.

The Pappa al Pomodoro, a classic Tuscan tomato-bread soup, and pappardelle Bolognese, wild boar ragù over pasta, are the shining stars in executive chef Angela Tamura’s kitchen at Pèppoli. With an array of accolades under her belt, including Chef of the Year at the Napa Valley Mustard Festival, Tamura’s dishes offer vast competition to the breathtaking ocean and golf course views from the restaurant.

4) The Terrace at The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua - Maui, HI

The plantation-inspired design only highlights the exotic location, with its slow-moving fans and wood screens. But it’s not all relaxation for executive chef John Zaner at The Terrace, who has headed the restaurant since 2003. Zaner oversees a staff of 100 in the seven kitchens at the 548-room resort. Start your day with a breakfast of fresh fruit and Hawaiian specialties before heading out to the Plantation Course for a day on the links.

5) Whistling Straits Restaurant at Whistling Straits - Kohler, WI

In 2012, Whistling Straights restaurant earned the Three Diamond Award from AAA and the Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator magazine. The cuisine, which boasts a British Isles flair, features favorites like the pork belly sliders served with savoy cabbage and sweet potato fries, and sautéed escargot with applewood-smoked bacon, mushrooms, and wine sauce. All dishes are of course paired with a breathtaking view of Lake Michigan.

6) The Gallery at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort - Bandon, OR

Executive chef Don McCradic and his culinary team try to keep all aspects local at The Gallery Restaurant. McCradic developed his menu to blend the best of the Northwest with Oregon wines, Pacific Northwest seafood, and prime aged beef. Favorite dishes include the grilled scallops and shrimp with rice noodles and mushrooms, and the pork shoulder with white beans, kale, and onion jam.

7) The Ocean Room at Kiawah Island Golf Resort - Kiawah Island, SC

Under the direction of executive chef Brendon Bashford, The Ocean Room has racked up an impressive collection of awards, including four stars from Forbes, four diamonds from AAA, and an award of excellence in 2010 and 2011 from Wine Spectator. Not only does the restaurant offer some astounding dishes, like pork belly confit and 130-degree filet mignon, but their certified sommelier Garth Herr will help any diner choose the perfect wine from their selection of more than 1,000 bottles.

8) The 1895 Grille at Pinehurst Resort - Pinehurst, NC

If 2013 isn’t your year to try The 1895 Grille, then it’s next year for sure. Pinehurst will host the U.S. Open and the U.S. Women’s Open Championships in 2014. And with the only four diamond AAA rating in the area, you know you’re in for a treat. For ultimate decadence, try the triple chocolate soufflé or opt for one of the nightly specials for a truly unique experience.

9) The Restaurant at Meadowood Napa Valley - Napa Valley, CA

Having earned three Michelin stars for the restaurant, it seems as though chef Christopher Kostow at Meadowood Napa Valley knows exactly how to wield a butcher knife. Kostow developed the American-inspired 10-course menu to reflect the flavors of Napa Valley. And what better way to do that with more than 1,200 different wines to choose from…


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club


A Golfer's Guide to the Best Halfway-House Grub in America

The hot dog is the building block. It's the default order when you're playing an unfamiliar course or when you get to the turn and don't know what you want.

A base model costs around $3, can be ready in less than a minute, and is a blank slate for toppings and condiments. You can hold it in one hand as you're walking to the next tee and wolf it down in three or four bites without taking off your glove. And—let's be honest—even a mediocre one on a grocery-store bun tastes pretty good with a cold beer or an iced tea.

But the best golf food aspires to do more than just deliver quick calories, carbs and protein between nines. It stands out. It's almost as much a part of the playing experience as the tee shot on a signature hole or the view from the 18th tee.

We asked more than 2,000 players nationwide—from pros to average hackers—to name their favorite golf-food item. The rules were straightforward. It had to be something on the regular menu at a halfway house or clubhouse in the United States and something you could conceivably eat at the turn. (That means the lovely dry-aged steak dinner at your club doesn't count.)

The response was overwhelming, with nominees from Hawaii to Maine and all points between. Our voters covered the staples in all shapes, sizes and accessories—from giant custom hot dogs to hand-ground boutique burgers. They also identified clever and unique dishes that are a fundamental part of the history of the course or club where they're served.

The runaway winner, Olympic Club's iconic burger dog, checks both boxes with authority. The quarter-pound offspring of a marriage between a fresh-baked hot-dog bun and a premium, cigar-shape burger, the burger dog is both familiar and new. The ultimate testament to the burger dog's status? Served for more than 60 years in the same form from the same nondescript stand, the $7.50 sandwich is probably more memorable for a first-time guest than any hole on Olympic Club's Lake Course, a five-time U.S. Open host venue and 2021 U.S. Women's Open site.

You don't need a membership at an exclusive golf club to enjoy what the best halfway houses have to offer, either. Municipal, daily-fee and resort courses are all represented on our list—from the "Best in L.A." wings at Griffith Park to the homemade barbecue at Streamsong in Florida and Prairie Lakes in Texas.

And if you prefer your food ahead of your round instead of in the middle, we have a couple of go-to places for you. Coronado's prime-rib machaca burrito sets the breakfast standard, along with Jefferson Park's version of the BLT—which includes avocado and a fried egg.

It's a great time to be a golfer with a few bucks in your pocket and a few minutes before you need to hit your next shot.

(This article was first published in 2016)

1. BURGER DOG
Olympic Club, San Francisco

With Hollywood types, some hyperbole is to be expected. It's one thing for Justin Timberlake to declare the venerated burger dog served at San Francisco's Olympic Club as the best burger he has ever eaten. But the hamburger shaped to fit a hot-dog bun has become a part of the 156-year-old club's landscape—literally. Originally created by Bill Parrish for his Hot Dog Bills stand outside the club's Lake Course, the sandwich became so popular with players stepping across the street for a food break that Olympic asked Parrish to move the stand inside the grounds to serve as the halfway house. Bill's daughter, Candy, took over the operation in the 1980s. Today, she, her husband, Jack, and her two sons, Max and Grahm, oversee three stands across Olympic's 45 holes and practice range and cook up roughly 200 burger dogs each day for lucky members and guests. The star of the show hasn't changed a lick since the beginning: a quarter pound of ground chuck (85 percent lean) formed into an oblong patty, cooked medium rare and topped with cheese, red relish, mustard, dill pickles and onions. Parrish isn't possessive of the burger dog's secrets: The recipe is on the Hot Dog Bills website, and she'll even sell you a plastic mold to get the torpedo shape just right. "It's a good grind of meat, a really hot grill and some salt and pepper," Parrish says. "And the bun? It has to be toasted."

2. FRANCHEESY
Butterfield Country Club, Oak Brook, Ill.

Metro Chicago takes deep pride in its hot dogs—in all their iterations. Butterfield's version starts with the quintessential Chicago Red Hot split and grilled, and adds bacon and American cheese. From there, you can go true Chicago style and add the "garden"—sweet relish, pickles, tomatoes and onions. Just don't ask for ketchup. It's heresy in the 708.

3. LOBSTER BLT ON CIABATTA ROLL
Belgrade Lakes (Maine) Golf Club